Seth Godin wrote this a while ago and recently I have been thinking about it a lot:

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If you’re used to a messy desk, cleaning it will probably be a temporary measure.

Credit card companies have discovered that if a person carries $2,000 in debt with a $3,000 credit limit, they’ll probably have $4,000 in debt if the credit limit gets raised to $5,000.

People who live with drama at work will almost certainly invent new drama [of any scale] if the existing drama fades away.

The world is real, and opportunities and pain are unfairly and unevenly distributed.

At the same time, our narrative and our habits are real as well, and they work to prove themselves right.

We organize our lives to maintain the pressures and boundaries we’re used to.

We’d like to pretend we’re just going to bear with it until we get through this urgency, but we’re usually lying to ourselves.

A new habit takes at least thirty uncomfortable days to form, and a new habit is unrelated to the external forces [positive and negative] that we’re so good at finding and embracing.

— Seth Godin

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Habits are powerful things.

Our progress or lack thereof, is based on our habits, those things we keep doing repeatedly without even thinking about them.

We are what we repeatedly do as Aristotle would say.

James Clear in his powerful book, Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones, says the following:

“Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you wish to become. No single instance will transform your beliefs, but as the votes build up, so does the evidence of your new identity.”

Having goals is important, but ultimately we do not rise to the level of our goals. We fall to the level of our habits.

If we want to achieve new things, we need to develop new habits that takes us to our desired outcomes.

Our habits are not fixed, we can change them by adopting a growth mindset. Changing our habits is like learning how to ride a bike.

Don’t make resolutions, create habits.

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