I always feel like an imposter.

This past week I felt like an imposter. When you deal with experts with amazing track record and credentials, it is easy to feel like an imposter.

So yeah I always feel like an imposter. At least when I’m doing my best work.

The imposter syndrome had been around long before the term was coined in 1978 by Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes.

Imposter syndrome is that noise in our heads that reminds us we have no business raising our hand, proposing for that project, jumping in the water, being in the room, or even standing on stage.

And I feel like an imposter often.

That is because my best work involves doing things I have never done before.

Recent research estimates that 40 percent of the workforce has a job that requires innovation, human interaction, and decision making. And for each of these people, every day exposes them to the feeling of being a fraud.

Of course you are not sure it is going to work. How could you be?

The person you are serving might take offense, or walk away, or simply might not speak the same language.

Of course there is no normal, no proven best practices, no established rulebook or recipe.

When you innovate, come with new things, it is easy to feel like an imposter.

However, the very nature of innovation is to act as if:

To act as if you are on to so something.

To act as if you are working it out.

To act as if it is going to work.

To act as if you have a right to be there.

To act as if you are good enough.

And along the way, you can discover what does not work on your way to finding out what does.

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