smart-2

Are you the smartest one in the room, always?

Do people say “wow” every time you say something?

Does your team constantly look for your advice and open their mouths wide to receive it while clapping happily like a penguin?

It is good to be the smartest one in the room, but over time your team should become smarter than you [at least in some areas].

If you are always the smartest person in the room, then you might want to reconsider your judgement and your leadership style.

You may like being needed now, but over time, being the smartest man in the room is a quick way to obsolescence.

Are you the Smartest man in the room? Don’t be.

Force others around you to become better than you. 

The role of a leader is to produce other leaders, not followers.

If you happen to be the smartest man in the room, you might want to down a tablespoon of humility and think on this statement, “I can learn something from everyone, and everyone is smarter than me in some way.”

Bring out the best in your players and teammates by allowing them to be the smartest man in the room.

You be the otter, go ahead, clap for them.

In times of crisis, we think we want our leaders to be smart, but what we want is our leaders to be humble.

Overconfidence is the most common flaw, a huge disadvantage of experts.

If incompetence is the disease of the novice, overconfidence is the disease of the expert.

Experts and leaders need to be humble more than they need to be good.

Yes it is good to be an expert, but the problem is that as you get more and more good at what you do, you run the risk of being overconfidence and arrogant.

It is always important as an expert to always get yourself in check by being in rooms where you are not the smartest one.

Surround yourself with people who are not afraid to say no to you, who don’t think you are all that.

Be receptive to good feedback that is contrary to what you believe.

You are not always right, even though you might be the smartest one in the room.

 

 

 

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