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Something I often tell myself when I approach a project is “This might not work.” Everything that you have never done before might not work. When you do creative and innovative work, “it might not work.”

But the fact it might not work is exactly what makes it interesting. When I started this blog five years ago it was something that might not work. There are still people who don’t resonate with my views and sometimes rants and that’s okay and there are people whom it works for them.

At some level, “this might not work” is at the heart of all important projects, of everything new and worth doing.

This might not work paralyses a lot of people to freeze and not implement their amazing plans. It paralyses them into inaction, into watering down their art and into not delivering.

“This might not work” is either a curse, something that you struggle with and freeze, or it’s a blessing, a chance to fly and do work you never thought possible.

Mark’s Facebook might not have worked, Alan Junior’s Project Isizwe (that provides free wifi to people of Tshwane Metro) might not have worked, Gomolemo’s TEDxGaborone might not have worked, Vuka Advisory Board might not have worked, Nthabeleng’s YWBN Co-operative Bank’s might not have worked, a number of game changing projects might not have worked. But they did them anyways and they worked.

Some of the article I write here might not work for you. But it turns out that I don’t just write for you. I also write to remind myself of what I’m hoping to become as well. Hearing myself, months later, reading something I didn’t remember writing or reading, I shed a few tears. Yes, this is work worth doing. Yes, being out on a limb, risking something that might not work is exactly where I want to be.

I believe doing things that might not work is exactly where we are needed… out on a limb, on the edges, doing ridiculous things, but when they do work, they change the course of humanity.

Revolutions might not work, most failed, but when they succeed, they destroy what we thought was perfect and enable what we thought was impossible.

This might not work, do it anyways.

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